• 270-826-2247
  • Mark.Kellen@ky.gov
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Kentucky Chautauqua Performance: Aunt Molly Jackson, Pistol Packin’ Woman

1880-1960

Pistol Packin’ Woman – Portrayed by Anne Shelby
Feisty, funny, and completely fearless, Aunt Molly Jackson lived for nearly 50 years in the coal camps of Southeastern Kentucky, where her father, brothers, husband, and sons were miners.

In the camps, Aunt Molly delivered babies, nursed the sick, organized for the union, and wrote songs that described the miners’ lives. Alan Lomax, who collected Aunt Molly’s songs for the Library of Congress, said, “Her songs of protest can only be matched by those of Woody Guthrie, but they were more passionate than his, and they cut deeper.”

When Theodore Dreiser and his committee of writers visited Harlan and Bell counties in 1931 to investigate conditions in the coalfields, Aunt Molly impressed them with her eloquence and with her intimate knowledge of life in the camps.

As a result, Dreiser urged her to come to New York, where her heartfelt songs and lively stories made her a popular spokesperson for striking miners and their families.

Limited seating, Pre-registration is required.

Contact: Kim McGrew-Liggett, Arts Administrator, kim.mcgrew@ky.gov (270) 827-1893

22 Mar

Aunt Molly Jackson, Pistol Packin’ Woman

Kentucky Chautauqua Performance: Aunt Molly Jackson, Pistol Packin’ Woman

1880-1960 Pistol Packin’ Woman - Portrayed by Anne Shelby Feisty, funny, and completely fearless, Aunt Molly Jackson lived for nearly 50 years in the coal camps of Southeastern Kentucky, where her father, brothers, husband, and sons were miners. In the camps, Aunt Molly delivered babies, nursed the sick, organized for the union, and wrote songs that described the miners’ lives. Alan Lomax, who collected Aunt Molly’s songs for the Library of Congress, said, “Her songs of protest can only be matched by those of Woody Guthrie, but they were more passionate than his, and they cut deeper.” When Theodore Dreiser and his committee of writers visited Harlan and Bell counties in 1931 to investigate conditions in the coalfields, Aunt Molly impressed them with her eloquence and with her intimate knowledge of life in the camps. As a result, Dreiser urged her to come to New York, where her heartfelt songs and lively stories made her a popular spokesperson for striking miners and their families. Limited seating, Pre-registration is required. Contact: Kim McGrew-Liggett, Arts Administrator, kim.mcgrew@ky.gov (270) 827-1893

Event Details

  • Date: May 12
  • Time: 12:15 pm - 1:15 pm
  • Event Category:

Organizer

  • Name: Kim Mcgrew
  • Phone: 270-826-2247
  • Email: kim.mcgrew@ky.gov

  • John James Audubon State Park Museum
  • 3100 US-41
    Henderson, KY 42420 United States
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  • Phone:
  • 270-826-2247